Why study hotel management

The tourism and hospitality industry continues to grow globally increasing the need for qualified people to join and make their mark on the industry. Being a hotel manager can be a hard and challenging job, but it is also one that is very rewarding, has excellent job opportunities, and for the right people, it can offer an environment for them to be highly successful in. Here are five of the top reasons to study hotel management.

1. You get to see the world

Studying and qualifying to be a hotel manager opens up a world of possibilities, literally. The skills required to manage a hotel in one country are the same as in another. Hotels exist in every town and city in the world. You will have the chance the work in the world’s greatest cities and its hidden treasures.

2. Early opportunities for a leadership role

The hospitality industry offers fast progress and on-the-job training. Allowing you to take on a managerial role at a relatively young age. This is great news for those who are natural leaders and are keen to use their talents. It also provides excellent experience if you want a career change later in life.

3. It’s not a 9-5

For some people this will be a negative, they crave the routine a 9-5 job offers. For many others, the chance to work in a more varied and dynamic manner can be very appealing. No two days are the same working in a hotel, it is a job that will constantly keep you on your toes and provide some great experiences.

4. You get to be creative

Many people associate creativity with writers and painters, but there are many other forms of creativity. As a hotel manager, you will have to come up with creative and innovative ideas to ensure your hotel provides guests with the best possible experience.

5. Earning potential

Thanks to the high levels of responsibility involved, qualified hotel managers often find the salary for entry positions to be very competitive. These rates go up considerably when working in capital cities. There are excellent opportunities to progress your career becoming a general manager or even managing your own chain of hotels.

How will Brexit affect the hospitality industry?

The main issue with Brexit is that nobody knows exactly how it will wash out. Brexiteers, by and large, are confident that things will go well, that the UK is shrugging off an immense load of unnecessary legislation and will be free – able to make preferential deals with other countries, including individually with other EU members. But even Brexiteers cannot be absolutely certain that this will happen, and most financial and political experts – those who have watched the tide of the global economy and its responses to drastic political action over the decades and centuries – are fairly certain that things will not go as easily as might be hoped. When it comes specifically to the hospitality industry, there are a number of factors to take into account.

Manpower

Hospitality work, especially in the lower echelons, tends to be hard work performed at unsociable hours for the national minimum wage or thereabouts: few British people are willing to work these hours for so little money. Seasonal workers from the EU have traditionally filled the gaps left by the British workers, happily coming in for pre-sunrise starts or whiling away the quiet, dark hours behind the 24-hour reception desk as this means that they can pay their way, and get to thoroughly explore their temporary home country. Many of these temporary casual workers have already stopped coming into the UK, preferring to gain their travel and work experience in countries that are still firmly in the EU and that have proven themselves welcoming to foreign workers. After Brexit, this decline will most likely increase sharply, leaving enormous gaps in the hospitality market.

Ingredients and dishes

A large proportion of the UK’s food is imported from the EU under very favourable agreements, making it possible to have a fully cosmopolitan menu without the excessive costs that this would previously have given rise to. After Brexit, it is almost certain that prices of products will fluctuate quite wildly, probably shooting up at first – or perhaps being marked by instances of non-availability as any available stocks will be earmarked for existing EU members before third-parties can be satisfied. Once things have settled down, the UK may find itself having to accept deals on products that are available due to surplus crops rather than being able to choose which goods it wants. This may drive restaurant menus to change more often than would otherwise be desirable.

The hospitality industry, almost always, depends on spare money being available for leisure travel, and sometimes even for business conferences and meetings. In the event that the economy suffers as much as experts seem to be saying that it will: the hospitality industry will almost certainly suffer losses, with only those outlets with strong business practices, good financial reserves and a plan for the future already being actioned promised the chance of survival.

16 Michelin Star Deletions for 2020

Following the latest Michelin announcements earlier this month, a record amount of new stars were awarded in the 2020 Michelin guide; seeing 1 new three-star restaurant, 4 new two-stars and 3 new one-stars in Britain, including 3 new stars in the Lake District and Manchester’s first star in over 40 years!

Success for some however, can always mean disappointment for others. So, we’ve taken a look at some of this year’s omissions.

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How do you open a Pop-Up Restaurant?

There are many benefits of having a pop-up restaurant, that are similar to having a traditional brick and mortar restaurant but without the high cost of opening. A pop-up is a great way for a chef to show off their culinary skills, whilst expanding their culinary careers. This is as well as levelling the dining field and being able to offer gourmet food at an affordable price. Below we have listed the 7-step guide that will help you to launch your very own pop-up restaurant.

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Hospitality Issues of 2016

As well as a range of food trends that took over 2016, there has also been a number of hospitality issues that have plagued the industry. We had a look to see what those challenges were and whether they could be overcome in 2017.

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Duties of a Sous Chef

The role of a Sous Chef is one of the most sought out positions in the culinary industry.

A Sous Chef is the second in command in the kitchen, below the Executive Chef.

The role of Sous Chef involves significant responsibility, as the Sous Chef must have the capability of leading other workers in the kitchen, remain organised and professional, and report vital information to the Executive Chef.

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It’s your time to shine with QHotels

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Right on Q…
The search is on for bright new talent

If you’re a Hospitality and Events 2016 Graduate and want to put everything you’ve learnt into practice, look no further than QHotels. Their outstanding Graduate Programme ‘Your Time To Shine’ could be the perfect career route for you.

On our quest to discover more we spoke to Lisa Redding, Group Resource Manager at QHotels who gave us a snapshot of what’s on offer.
The 2 Graduate Programmes cover all areas within the hospitality industry, giving you an opportunity to learn new skills as you progress through the different areas of the business. Whether it’s an operational management role you want to explore, or the busy environment of a conference sales office is where you want to be, whatever your goal QHotels will be with you every step of the way to develop you as one of their Managers of the future.

Applications are still open for late entrants.

Discover more here…
http://www.qhotelsjobs.co.uk/media/147448/qhotels-graduates-web-booklet.pdf